Old-skyline-sign.jpgKen and I are under contract at Vermont Woods Studios to purchase the old Skyline Restaurant on Hogback Mountain in Marlboro, Vermont for use as a small furniture showroom, administrative office and cafe.  Right now our emphasis is on conducting a feasibility study to see if the property can be renovated to meet our needs. 

If you're local to Southeastern Vermont, you no-doubt remember eating a delicious, hearty breakfast at Skyline while enjoying the incredible 100 Mile view.  It was the kind of place you thought would always be there for you, the next time you were in the neighborhood. I'm not sure why the restaurant shut down (about 4 years ago?) but it's in pretty bad shape at the moment.

We've been working with Jeremy Coleman of J Coleman & Company Architects on evalutaing the condition of Skyline's heating, air conditioning, plumbing and structure these past couple weeks to see which systems will have to be totally gutted and replaced and which, if any may be partially salvaged.  It looks to me like there will be a lot of replacement. 

If you're in the area or you're interested in green building or the story of Skyline, keep an eye on our project through this blog and Facebook.  We'll be posting progress as we go.  If Skyline is a feasible location for a Vermont made furniture showroom and we do end up purchasing the property, we'll be looking for local help to transform it.  Contact us if you interested in getting involved.

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

2 thoughts on “Vermont Skyline Project: Feasibility Study

  1. Saw this on your Vermont Woods Facebook page. It would be a gutsy move.
    My two cents:
    On the plus side, it’s re-using an existing building, making it new again in a green way. And, there’s a ton of traffic across the street.
    But on the down side:
    – Those people across the way are stopping for the view, the gift shop, the nature museum. It’s going to be difficult to draw them across a busy highway, and make them climb a hill, to look at furniture.
    – Alternatively, you need to get people to pull into the parking lot, attracted by the furniture sign and whatever publicity you can do. That’s hard, too — on Route 9 they are on their way from one place to another, not looking for a place to shop for furniture.
    So:
    I could see a restaurant in that place again, but not a furniture store. I would be looking instead at locations with a lot of foot traffic, like Wilmington (once rebuilt) or downtown Brattleboro.

    Reply

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