Shaker Desk and Bookcase
Modern Shaker 2-Glass Door Bookcase and Campaign Desk both in Walnut)

Use Bookcases to Showcase More Than Just Your Encyclopedia Collection!

One of the things I love about visiting other people’s homes is seeing what statement they’re making about their personality. Are they sentimental, creative or conservative? Do they like to display a lot of personal items or keep things more uniform? The spaces I enjoy the most are the ones that tell a unique story. From the layout, color and material of the furniture to the number of pictures hanging on the wall, you want your space to represent you.

I like to think of a design space with the same mindset I think of my wardrobe. I dress a certain way to portray an image that is representative of my personality.

As Coco Chanel said, “Dress shabbily and they remember the dress; dress impeccably and they remember the woman.”

That saying is true when you’re decorating your home, too. We’ve all been to one of those houses where you walk in and you’re instantly overwhelmed because it’s covered head-to-toe with “stuff”. To avoid doing that (or simply over decorating) you can focus your collection of home goods and keepsakes to designated areas.

Instead of using up precious table and counter space, a unique way to showcase your collectibles is with a bookcase. It’s also a nice way to break up your space and can compliment your other furniture. We have a variety of beautiful, handcrafted bookcases, filing cabinets and occasional tables and during our Home Office & Living Room Furniture Sale*, the time has never been better to shop and save.

I’ve included a sampling of bookcases from our collection to highlight the different ways you can furnish your space to tell your story.

Cherry Moon Bookcase in Cherry

Cherry Moon Bookcase- This bookcase with its open display, is great for both organizing and showcasing keepsakes and artwork. It features the signature Cherry Moon reverse tapered legs and gentle arching curve on the bottom. It is available in a variety of heights and adjustable shelf options and can be made in Cherry, Maple and Walnut woods.

Custom Shaker Bookcase with Full Glass Doors in Cherry

Custom Shaker Bookcase Full Glass Doors- If your keepsakes and artifacts are a bit more fragile, this may be the bookcase for you. The double, glass panel doors protect your collection while allowing you and your guests to admire the display. This piece is customized to fit any space and features adjustable shelf options. It is available in Cherry, Maple, Oak and Walnut woods with a variety of Finishes.

Solid Wood Bookcase with Panel Doors

Solid Wood Bookcase with Panel Doors-This versatile bookcase allows you to display artwork, books and keepsakes as well as serve as a storage space, featuring panel doors on the bottom third of the unit. Show what you want and hide what you don’t! This case is customizable to fit for your space and has adjustable shelf options. It is available in Cherry, Maple, Oak and Walnut woods with a variety of Finishes.

Ladder Style Bookcase in Cherry

Ladder Style Bookcase- If you’re going for a modern minimalist style, this may be the piece for you. This bookcase offers 5 hand-crafted shelves in an open design allowing you to display your books, artwork and collectables. In addition to the standard case size, this piece can be customized and is available in Cherry, Maple, Oak and Walnut woods.

If you’re not sure where to start or what your looking for, use the wardrobe analogy: When I’m looking to refresh my wardrobe, I often pick a theme or style as a starting point, do the same for your space. Is it organization that you’re in need of, protection for fragile artifacts or storage space? Once you’ve determined your need, pick a bookcase or cabinet and go from there.

Our friendly team is always available for any questions you may have about our solid wood furniture, contact us toll free at 888-390-5571. Shop for your living room and office furniture securely and conveniently from our online store, order by phone or stop into our Vernon, VT Showroom.

*$1,000 minimum order to qualify for sale prices

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Welcome to the team Megan!

Megan Fulton joins our Marketing team as the new Marketing Assistant. She will be taking the reins of our social media platforms, blogging and community involvement–as well as helping with marketing strategies and PR projects.

Megan Fulton

A graduate from Emerson College in Boston, MA with BS in Marketing Communications and minor in Psychology, Megan studied abroad in the Netherlands, in a refurbished 14th Century Castle, “Kasteel Well”. She’s traveled to 13 countries and some of her favorite cities are Amsterdam, Madrid and Lucerne.

Kasteel Well
Emerson College’s Kasteel Well-a view from the back of the Main Castle and inner moat.


Pictures from Megan’s time abroad-Sicily, Amsterdam, Barcelona

She has a passion for Human Rights that started when she was 18 and she began her journey with the non-profit organization, Calling All Crows. During her time with CAC she traveled alongside Boston bands, State Radio and Dispatch, first as an Alternative Break Tour Volunteer and worked her way up to an intern, Tour Leader and “Team Bostonia” Regional Coordinator.

Service Project Cologne
Megan at Service Project in Cologne, Germany with members of the band State Radio and Alternative Break Tour Volunteers

Megan is excited to join the Vermont Woods Studios team and use her passion and experience to help grow the mission of VWS.

Megan Dog Charlie
Megan with her dog Charlie and a picture she snapped during the Red Sox victory parade in 2013

When she’s not here at our Stonehurst Showroom she can be found walking or hiking with her black lab Charlie or cheering on the Red Sox and Patriots!

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

monarch butterfly chrysalises
Two chrysalises housing monarch pupa

Vermont Woods Studios Prepares Monarchs for Take-off

On a beautiful day straddling the line between August and September, we huddled on the deck of Vermont Woods Studios at our Stonehurst property. Five adults and two children all gazing in mirrored excitement at the progress of our monarch caterpillars as they forge their ways into butterfly-hood.

“I’m going to name him Jeff!” One of the young boys informed the group as Peggy Farabaugh, the CEO of Vermont Woods Studios and head caterpillar-rearer, gently scooped up two prized caterpillars and secured them safely in a jar for the boys to bring to their grandmother’s.

It has been two weeks since the arrival of the caterpillar babies (or larva) and already they are well on their way to adulthood. However, their transformation is far more magical than that of any other aging process. They came to us as tiny creatures no bigger than a grain of rice and have rapidly transformed into vibrant, two inched beauties that scuttle about their mesh hamper confinement eating milkweed and maturing with natural grace.

It is marvelous to watch the caterpillars inch their way to the top of the hamper and methodically suspend themselves upside down in a J shape. This is a signal to the world that the caterpillars are ready to enter the pupa or chrysalis stage of life. The caterpillars work tirelessly in this J-shape to molt their skin and transform their outer appearance into the grass green, gold speckled chrysalis.

“I wonder what they’re doing in there all the time.” Peggy mused, affectionately grooming the caterpillar habitat. The allure of mystery gripped us all as we watched the beautiful chrysalises hang, cautiously enveloping the transforming caterpillar.

In about two weeks the chrysalises will have turned black and the monarch butterfly will be ready to emerge with damp, fledgling wings. In the short span of two hours, the monarch’s wings will dry and it will be lusting for flight. Thus our babies will leave us and safety of the Stonehurst deck.

However, it won’t be a sad day, for on this day we will have reached our goal. With the help of Orley R.  “Chip” Taylor, founder of the Monarch Watch program at the University of Kansas, we will have completed cycle one of the Monarch Restoration project. The Vermont Woods Studios company developed an objective: to help restore the monarch population. Success is heavily contingent on three pillars: milkweed restoration, healthy, migration-ready monarchs and continued research.

Last October and November, Peggy and the Vermont Woods Studios staff went out in search of milkweed. Pods gathered along route 142 were brought back to the studio where seeds were harvested and packaged for distribution.

Seeds were distributed to local gardeners and nature enthusiasts, clients and planted on the Stonehurst property. 1 in 100 milkweed seeds strewn across the earth will produce a plant. Because of these small odds, we chose to carefully plant 80 seeds on the Stonehurst property yielding 80 viable milkweed plants.

Along with learning the importance of carefully planting the milkweed seeds, the Vermont Woods Studios staff have also developed important information for rearing monarch caterpillars:

  • Whenever it is possible, raise the caterpillars in a terrarium
  • Do not allow direct sunlight to hit the terrarium
  • Monarch caterpillars grow quickly and this process can be messy, so cleaning the terrarium frequently is a must
monarch caterpillar on milkweed
One of our monarch caterpillars getting ready to transition into a chrysalis

Once our monarchs are ready for flight, we have one last piece of the puzzle to put in place before we can call the project a success. Chip founded Monarch Watch in 1992 and has been studying monarch migration since 2005. The eastern monarchs born at the end of the summer months have the innate task of migrating to Mexico. This migration will take four generations of monarchs.

Our Stonehurst monarchs will fly just a portion of the way and then stop to lay eggs and die as the new babies begin the growing process and mature to fly their portion of the trip. This process will repeat until the final generation sails over sunny Mexico and makes themselves comfortable for eight to nine months when the United States is again habitable for the return of the monarchs.

How did people come to have such intimate detail about the migration pattern of these tireless creatures? The answer to this is evolving through research, which brings us to the final stage of the project: tagging the monarchs.

Before our monarchs take flight, we will place a small, adhesive tag, provided by Chip and his team on the wings of our monarchs. These tags will signal researchers to know where the monarchs came from and provide other valuable research that will continue to help rehabilitate the monarch population.

As we stand on the deck, without a chill in the air and watch the chrysalises form, we know the journey our caterpillars have before them. We discuss tagging the butterflies with nervous laughter, none of us having ever done it before; but were willing to try because we know that it is one key step in encouraging the comeback of these magical creatures.

(This is part two of a four part blog series on our Monarch Butterfly Restoration Project)

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Strolling of the Heifers

All dressed up for Mardi Gras! 

Strolling of the Heifers Weekend

They came. They strolled. And they looked fabulous. This weekend, a few members of the Green Team represented VWS at the Strolling of the Heifers parade. This being my first “stroll”, I was excited to see what sights and antics Brattleboro had in store.

The parade featured floats and displays from local businesses and organizations from around southeastern Vermont. Each one had a unique theme that tied into the agricultural theme of the event. One of my favorite ideas was from Edward Jones Investments with the slogan “How’s Your Nest Egg Doing?” with a float that was decorated with some live chickens and eggs. There was also a float for an organization that is near and dear to my heart: a local FFA chapter. And of course, there were plenty of heifers. Their handlers dressed each heifer in beads, flowers and bright colors to match this years Strolling of the Heifers theme, “Running of the Bulls meets Mardi Gras.”

Strolling of the Heifers

Representing the FFA! I walked in many parades and shows as a member, but never in a cow suit!

After the parade was over, the crowd all flooded to The Common to scored some “Strolling Swag” and free gifts from more local businesses. One exhibit in the event was the Woodlands exhibit, which we were a part of. Groups offered educational exhibits and demonstrations about forestry, logging, conservation, invasive species and, of course, the final product of effective forest harvesting, furniture. Vermont Woods Studios shared a tent with Wood-Net, represented by woodworker Rick Gravelin. We showcased our sustainable outdoor POLYWOOD furniture, while Rick displayed a beautiful assortment of handmade, wooden clocks and watches. Michelle, Peggy and I had so much fun talking with local residents about our furniture and where it comes from and boasting about our new Vernon showroom. Michelle even got to talk about our solid wood dining furniture with Peter Welch, a Vermont Congressman.

Did you attend the Stroll this weekend? Or does your town have a local agricultural fair you enjoy? Tell us about it here or on our Facebook wall!

Strolling of the Heifers

Every year, the stroll has special “sweepers” that follow the end of the parade to clean up 
the inevitable messes that heifers make. I thought it would be fitting for 
the sweepers to follow this blog too. :)




This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Tiger-conservation I'm trying not to feel too wounded.  We got a call from World Wildlife Fund WWF today.  I've been a contributing member and ardent promoter of their work since I graduated from college and got my first full time job in 1980.  After 31 years of enthusiastic support, they called me today to tell me that I'm not allowed to mention their name on my Vermont Woods Studios Furniture website anymore.

See… we recently launched a Save the Tiger campaign to raise awareness of the fact that all species of tigers are endangered and some are on the brink of extinction.  Their habitat is being destroyed and to some extent it's because corrupt timber conglomerates are clear-cutting the forests they live in and using the wood for cheap imported furniture and flooring that's sold in the US and Europe.  We oppose that and so does WWF.  We support their Save the Tiger fund and we encourage furniture shoppers to buy American furniture made from sustainably harvested American wood.

Well I guess they don't like their name being connected to a commercial venture.  I understand their concern about the fact that there are dirt ball websites out there that might use their name dishonestly, but really.  I asked WWF to spend 5 minutes on our website and tell me we're one of those guys.  They agreed that our committment to conservation seems genuine but then noted that in order to be considered WWF partners and refer to them on your website, a minimum "6 figure donation" is required annually along with a long list of other things.  Actually, I think we would be OK with the other requirements but $100,000 is equal to 1/6 of our total revenue (not profits) last year.  So now I have to face the fact that I've been summarily rejected by my all time favorite charity– an organization that had a profound influence on the whole concept defining Vermont Woods Studios Furniture.  How sad is that?

I'm going to finish crying in my beer tonight.  Tomorrow I'll be over it and moved on to other issues.  But tonight I can't help feeling a bit jaded about WWF and their corporate partnership program.  What do you think?

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.