National Wildlife Week
National Wildlife Week starts today.  With this year’s theme, “Branching Out for Wildlife”, the National Wildlife Federation is planting tens of thousands of trees in over 200 communities across the country—bringing children and adults together to provide crucial habitat for wildlife. 

Each year during the 3rd week of March our friends at the National Wildlife Federation celebrate wildlife, nature and our need to protect them. This year’s National Wildlife Week, March 18-23, explores the roles of trees for wildlife, people and communities.

As woodworkers, we at Vermont Woods Studios Fine Furniture have a thing about trees and forest conservation.   NWF captures our sentiments: “from the canopy to the roots, trees are critical for thousands of wildlife species—from woodpeckers that drill on the trunks of mature trees, to beavers felling trees to build their homes, and huge moose eating tree leaves and sprouts in the forest.  Not only do trees benefit wildlife at all stages of their lives—by providing shelter, nesting places, food, and hiding places for predators and prey—trees are also the lungs of the Earth, because they renew our air supply by absorbing carbon dioxide and producing oxygen for us to breathe.”

NWF is planting tens of thousands of trees this week, in over 200 communities across the country—bringing children and adults together to provide crucial habitat for wildlife.  You can join their celebration by  planting a tree, making a donation or sharing a photo of wildlife in trees (upload your photos to their Facebook timeline).

It’s a little early to be planting trees in Vermont this season, so at Vermont Woods Studios we’ll be participating by donating $1/sale to our Plant a Billion Trees initiative.  Trees are the longest living organisms on our planet and one of the earth’s greatest natural resources.  What are you doing to conserve them?

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Beautiful Tree Photos
Trees are not only beautiful, they provide oxygen to breath, absorbe carbon pollution, improve water quality, help prevent erosion, provide food and building materials, create shade, and help make our natural world an inspiration.

Who doesn’t love trees?  As a purveyor of natural wood furniture, we are big tree lovers.  Not surprisingly, forest conservation is a big part of our mission at Vermont Woods Studios.  If we’re going to be providing solid wood furniture for generations into the future, we have to focus on forest conservation today.

This morning I was searching for a tree photo to help us show people how your furniture gets from the forest to your living room.  I couldn’t believe how many spectacular tree photos are out there!  It’s obvious we’re not the only tree fanatics on this planet.

Pinterest Boards: Tree Photos
It’s easy to get lost in the dozens of “Tree Boards” on Pinterest.  In addition to “beautiful tree photos” there’s a board for “unusual trees” like  this tree that’s grown through the hood of an old junk car.

Pinterest seems to be the keeper of some of the world’s favorite tree photos.  The Pinterest “Trees” page contains boards on every tree topic you can think of, from “tree houses” to “roots”, “forests”, “tree life” and  “tree tatoos”.

Then there’s another love afair with trees on a site called (pardon me) Tree Porn (somewhat akin to the website Kendall showed me called Food Porn– great food photos and recipes).   40 Nautrally Beautiful Photos of Trees is another web page showcasing amazing tree photos.

Beautiful Tree Photos | Tree Porn | Sustainable Wood Furniture
This site is not what you think. 

OK, now I have to get back to writing a post about how your furniture gets from the forest to your living room.  But this was a fun digression.

 

 

 

 

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Custom milling by Vince Johnson in Vernon VT
Vince Johnson of Johnson Custom Milling in Vernon, VT is milling trees at Stonehurst that had to be taken down for safety reasons. Now we can use them for future phases of construction at our new Vermont Woods Studios fine furniture showroom.

Since forest conservation is a big part of my mission at Vermont Woods Studios, it’s been a little heart-breaking for me to see some of the 100 year old trees at Stonehurst being taken down. There were a handful that were leaning over the house and garage and Ken insisted that they were a hazard and had to go.

But lucky for me, Vince Johnson of Johnson Custom Milling in Vernon, VT came to the rescue. Vince is milling the trees so we can use them for future phases of construction at Stonehurst, our fine furniture showroom. Here’s a video of his portable sawmill in operation.

Ken and Jeremy Coleman of J Coleman & Company Architects are looking into building a solar kiln to dry the wood so we can use it as soon as possible.

And Dennis has plans to siphon off some of the wood to build bluebird houses, owl boxes and such. It’s turning out to be a fun project after all. Let us know on our Facebook if you have any thoughts or advice for us as we go down this road of renovation at Stonehurst, our future fine furniture showroom. We’ll be posting photos of the transformation and announcing details of our open house as we get closer to completion.

 

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Cherry-wood-tree

Dennis took this picture of a black cherry tree on his property in New Hampshire. Our cherry wood furniture typically comes from PA though, which has soils and climate more ideally suited to growing black cherry trees.

Heather Barrett mentioned the other day that many customers are coming
to us by way of Google when they're searching for answers to questions
like "where does cherry wood come from"? 

At Vermont Woods
Studios we feel it's important to provide detailed information about
where your furniture comes from.  We want customers to know that our
wood is all sustainably harvested and that forest conservation is a fundamental part of our mission.

We source as much wood as we can locally, preferably right here in Vermont. Cherry wood
however isn't a big component of the Green Mountain Forest.  There are a few
cherry trees here and there across Vermont, but Pennsylvania is really
the Cherry Capitol of the world and that's where we get most of our
cherry wood. It is arguably the finest cherry wood on earth and is
prized for its lovely red color, grain and luster.

Fortunately in 1995 the state of Pennsylvania had the foresight to protect and
preserve a great deal of their cherry wood resources.  They committed to
maintaining the state forest system sustainably and began green
certifying it, by the Forest Stewardship Council, FSC.

FSC is considered
the gold standard in third party certifications of forests so we can be
confident that the forests providing our cherry wood will be around to
enjoy for many generations… just like our cherry wood furniture.

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Arbor-day-plant-tree"Other holidays repose upon the past… Arbor Day proposes for the future." 

 

140 years after J. Sterling Morton initiated Arbor Day in 1872, the future brings an ever-increasing need to fulfill his mission of planting trees.

 

At Vermont Woods Studios, as a wood furniture company, forest conservation is part of the foundation of our business.  Without healthy, sustainable forests we have no future.

 

So we're celebrating Arbor Day today and honoring trees–the wonder plants of the universe.  How about joining us?  Here are some ideas for celebrating Arbor Day from The Arbor Day Foundation.  If you're not up for anything quite that ambitious, then maybe plant a tree for $1 on our Plant A Billion Trees webpage or just have a look at this beautiful 39 second video about trees and wood.

 

Or join the Arbor Day Foundation for $10 and get 10 free trees to plant in your yard.  Have I convinced you yet?  Just in case, I'll leave one final attempt.  This one by a professional–  poet Alfred Joyce Kilmer:

Trees

I think that I shall never see
A poem lovely as a tree.
A tree whose hungry mouth is prest
Against the sweet earth's flowing breast;
A tree that looks at God all day,
And lifts her leafy arms to pray;
A tree that may in summer wear
A nest of robins in her hair;
Upon whose bosom snow has lain;
Who intimately lives with rain.
Poems are made by fools like me,
But only God can make a tree.

Nationally, Arbor Day is celebrated tomorrow on April 27.  In Vermont the holiday is the first Friday in May or May 5th this year.  And just so you know, our state tree in Vermont is the Sugar Maple.  What is yours?

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.