Vermont Woodworker of the Year:  Brent Karner
Congratulations to Vermont Woodworker of the Year, Brent Karner of Clear Lake Furniture for his innovative design of high end stacking chairs for the University of Vermont’s Memorial Lounge.

Congratulations to Brent Karner of ClearLake Furniture in Ludlow for being selected Vermont Woodworker of the Year.  The award was presented to Brent last Friday by Mike Rainville, President of the Vermont Wood Manufacturing Association, VWMA. It was in recognition of his work in designing and crafting 150 eco-friendly, stackable cherry wood chairs for the University of Vermont’s Memorial Lounge on UVM’s Burlington campus.

Have you ever noticed that chairs in auditoriums are rarely handcrafted of solid wood and rarely comfortable?  Well it seems that Richard Cate, UVM Vice president for finance and administration decided to change that.  He insisted on finding a competitive bid for beautiful, comfy, high quality, Vermont made STACKABLE chairs and Brent Karner’s proposal fit the bill.

Brent, his brother and two of their craftsmen at Clear Lake Furniture spent 3 months designing and building the chairs.  Each chair contains 41 separate pieces.  Sheahan and Sons Lumber in Weatherfield transformed 400 local, sustainably harvested logs from Bethel, VT into 6,150 pieces of wood designed to Brent’s specs.  The seats were crafted by Don Heaton Upholstery in Chester, VT.  Everything from A to Z was locally made in Vermont!

Isn’t it great to see another example of Vermonters leading the way in the American Made manufacturing movement?

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Craftsmanship-fine-furnitureThe other day I noted that a customer asked us for a definition of "fine furniture" and since we could find no real consensus out there I decided to put out– well– yet another opinion, actually.  My first post was about the type of wood used for fine furniture.  I think the next aspect ought to be about craftsmanship.

I found this video by Brent and Derek Karner and their craftspeople at Clear Lake Furniture in Ludlow, VT.  It's really a great illustration of both the human and machine-driven craftsmanship that defines fine furniture.  In the video Brent shows the process of how fine wood furniture starts as trees, sustainably harvested from well managed forests.  Then he brings you into his workshop where to see his craftsmanship up close:  wood is rough sawn, planed, shaped, prepared for joinery and assembled.  He explains different types of joinery, like dovetails, mortise and tenon, splines and how they are created. 

I like Brent's discussion of craftsmanship in terms of man versus machine.  He concludes that, done properly, both methods can have excellent results although he shows that in many cases it's a blend of man and machine that's optimal.

In Vermont we have several woodworking purists who focus almost exclusively on the use of traditional hand tools, and their craftsmanship is exquisite.  One of my favorite companies working to preserve traditional handwork traditions is Shackleton-Thomas.  But the majority of Vermont's fine furniture makers do employ high precision modern machinery which not only brings the price of furniture down, but sometimes produces a more exacting result. 

The next aspect of fine furniture craftsmanship I want to mention is finish.  But let's do that another day. 

In the meantime, if you're in Vermont (which after all IS the Fine Furniture Capital of America) and you're looking to get a better understanding of fine craftsmanship, there are hundreds of small furniture makers who would be happy to introduce you to their craft.  Check out this great Vermont Forest Heritage brochure which lists furniture makers all around the state and provides a map showing where each one is and what their hours of operation are. Clearlake furniture is on the map and is on your way to Okemo Mountain.  It's open almost every day but call ahead for an appointment if you want to get a tour of their workshop and see their fine craftsmanship in motion.

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Clear-lake-furniture-vtVermont is home to some of the best fine furniture makers in America, and indeed the world.  Last month Vermont Woods Studios attended the annual Fine Furniture Festival and Design Contest in Woodstock, Vermont and it was bigger and better than ever.  I wanted to recognize the winners and share a few photos of their work with you.

 

Brent Karner of Clear Lake Furniture was awarded First Place in the Production Furniture category for his beautiful custom wall unit with bookcases, media storage and a fireplace mantle.

 

 

 

Johns-congdon-vt-custom-furniture

 

 

 

Johns Congdon took First Place in the Custom and Studio Furniture category for his Alienor Writing Desk.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marios-abacus-table-vt

 

 

 

 

Mario Messina's Abacus Table took Second Place in the Custom and Studio Furniture category.

 

 

 

 

 

 David-hurwitz-custom-furniture

 

David Hurwitz's State of Craft Table took tThird Place in the Custom and Studio Furniture Category.

 

 

Congratulations to everyone on your impressive achievements!  See more photos on our Facebook.

 

 

 

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.