Use Reclaimed Wood Dining Benches as a way to make your home naturally beautiful & sustainable.

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 What is Reclaimed Wood?

 Reclaimed wood dining benches are made from re-purposed, leftover lumber. Most reclaimed lumber comes from timber and decking rescued from old barns, warehouses, factories, and the like. Reclaimed wood is considered a premium material for furniture building because it is very strong, durable, and plentiful! The salvaged lumber is cleaned and handcrafted into a new, workable material–then finely crafted into unique rustic looking furniture!

 

reclaimed wood dining bench

Why Are Reclaimed Wood Dining Benches Great?

1. Reclaimed wood dining benches are eco-friendly. By re-purposing old lumber, they give this natural material a second life, renewing it and making it usable again. With the mass deforestation of our rainforests, it’s more important than ever to be mindful of the lifespan of your furniture and where it comes from. Buying a reclaimed wood bench isn’t going to save the planet, but buying a reclaimed bench over a bench that has been mass produced from rainforest wood, it’s an important contribution! (Note: None of our furniture comes from rainforest wood. Our craftsmen use as much wood as possible from North American forests)

2. Natural Character: Reclaimed wood dining benches are wonderful because they are unlike most pieces of dining furniture. The natural “flaws” in the wood stand out, making them unique pieces of furniture with lots of character.

3. Rustic Look: Reclaimed wood benches have a naturally rustic or antiqued look. This makes them perfect for passing down from generation to generation as they will never go out of style.

4. Versatility: These beautiful benches can be used in so many different ways. If you are tired of it in the kitchen, use it at the bottom of your bed to store books or blankets. Add a piece to your already rustic/farmhouse styled home to complete the look, or add this single rustic piece into your modern home for a chic fusion of styles.

Overall, reclaimed wood dining benches are wonderful additions to any home, no matter the style. They are easy solutions for a home looking to add some rustic charm to an unfinished space. What do you think of them? Let us know in the comments section!

The piece shown in this blog  is handcrafted in Vermont. The bench seat is made from high quality white pine or chestnut woods from reclaimed and recycled antique doors, floor boards, siding and other original components of historical New England Barns.

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Sean, one of our lovely sales team members, got creative and made this montage of our POLYWOOD outdoor furniture. Over the span of winter to spring, Sean captured a few images of our POLYWOOD adirondack chairs as the snow fell and melted. It shows how durable and weather resistant these chairs really are, maintaining their beauty throughout the seasons with very little maintenance!

The featured chairs are part of our current in-stock selection, but we also have them available in many other colors and styles with matching optional ottomans and all weather Sunbrella cushions. These chairs are 100% American made and are built not only to look beautiful on your porch or patio, but also to give you a lifetime of carefree enjoyment.

Our POLYWOOD furniture is made from recycled plastic lumber, but retains a classic outdoor furniture design. While they are made from recycled plastic containers (like milkjugs) they are designed to replicate the thickness, weight and strength of wood. They are comfy too!

If you’re like me and would rather avoid having to lug your outdoor furniture inside for the winter, POLYWOOD might just be for you! Take a peek at our collections online, or stop by our showroom and try it out yourself!

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

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 Admiring The Berkeley Platform Bed

We are always fans of the unique ways customers use our furniture in their homes. The photo above shows the beautiful Berkeley Platform Bed, likely set up in a guest bedroom or beach home of our customer, Bari B! The Berkeley Bed fuses Craftsman and Asian design styles, making it a sophisticated yet casual piece of furniture. This piece was crafted in natural cherry hardwood with American black walnut spindles, the bed features a low footboard designed for use with a mattress only!

This bed style focuses on clean lines and distinctive angles. It’s sleek, natural, and versatile–as it would easily suit many different decor styles.

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Complement your Berkeley Bed with Open Shelf Nightstands

Next to the bed is our ‘Open 3 Shelf Cherry Nightstand‘ that features 3 shelves and is specifically designed to allow for opening of optional under bed storage drawers with Copeland cherry storage beds. They are sleek and airy, giving the illusion of space while still being appropriate for storage of books and other things.

What do you think of the Berkeley platform bed? Let us know in the comments!

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

April 22, 2015 is “Earth Day”, a time when many people stop and think about what they can do to make the world a better place. At Vermont Woods Studios, we believe that businesses have a responsibility to do this- not only on Earth Day, but every day. We believe in being real, active global citizens that work hard to make the world a better place. We believe in giving future generations (of both humans and animals) a better world to live in!

So this Earth Day, we’d love to share some of our current Earth efforts: 

1. Benefit Sale for VCE:

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For one day only, we will be donating $25 from every sale to the Vermont Center for Eco Studies. This organization is dear to our hearts, and our mission, as they promote wildlife conservation across the Americas using the combined strength of scientific research and citizen engagement. We support them every year and are happy to do this special promotion for them!

2. Salamander Crossing:
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For more than 10 years, Peggy has been going out on rainy April nights and helping salamanders and other amphibians get to the vernal pools where they congregate to breed. All of these amphibians are abundant in Vermont (if seldom seen)—but that will change in places where they must cross roads to reach their breeding pools!  Volunteers are needed to help these little critters get to where they are going safely, in order to conserve their populations.

3. Preparing our Garden Sanctuary:
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For the second year in a row, we are preparing our butterfly and bee sanctuary garden. Earlier in the year we went out and planted milkweed for Monarchs, and now we are preparing a garden that will be a safe haven for bees, butterflies, and other critters! Dennis and Nina are hard at work today, tilling, cleaning, and prepping the area.

We hope that this Earth Day you will take some time to think about your own environmental impact and what you are doing to help protect animals and the planet. Even if your actions are small, they are important! What will you do for the Earth this year? Let us know in the comments section!

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

This post is one in a series about Vermont Woods Studios’ mission of rainforest conservation and our support of Bolivian environmentalists dedicated to reforestation and ecotourism in the AmazonPart 1Part 2Part 3Part 4.

Protectors of the Amazon | Madidi Travel | Eco Tourism at Serere
Our tour guide, Severo navigating the waters of the Beni River in the Bolivian Amazon.  Severo is one of a team of dedicated environmentalists who protect and defend the Serere Reserve against illegal loggers and other predators.  Rainforest conservation through eco tourism is their strategy & 100% of their profits go to conservation work and the local community.

Why Does the Amazon Need Protecting?

We talk a lot about rainforest conservation at Vermont Woods Studios and I’m sure many people wonder why we’re so fanatic about it.  Part of the reason for our forest conservation mission is is my love of animals and wildlife.  And part of it is that humanity is destroying a precious resource (that took billions of years to evolve) at a rate that surpasses any previous mass extinction. Consider that:

Forests have completely disappeared in 25 countries and another 29 countries have lost > 90% of their forest cover.

Madidi Travel: Protectors of the Amazon

We’ve written before about who’s responsible for destroying the rainforest.  Today I wanted to tell you about people who are dedicating their lives to conserving the rainforest.  Last week Kendall and I visited Riley, who was volunteering for them at Madidi Travel in the Serere Reserve in Bolivia.  Ecotourism supporting conservation is Madidi’s strategy.  They are a team led by the legendary environmental activist, Rosamaria Ruiz (featured in this National Geographic article).

Diego and M Tapir | Rescue Sanctuary at Serere | Maidid Travel
Diego manages many aspects of hospitality at the Serere Reserve.  I imagine this job is rather different from his previous experiences managing Club Med facilities!  Here he and Monsieur Tapir are having a moment.  Madidi Travel uses responsible ecotourism to fund rainforest conservation in the Bolivian Amazon.  The Serere Reserve functions as a sanctuary for rescued wildlife, many of whose mothers have been shot and eaten by illegal loggers.  Kendall, Riley and I had an amazing time getting to know the orphaned tapirs, monkeys, chonchos and capybaras.

After decades of conservation work in the Bolivian Amazon, which resulted in the creation of the Madidi National Park, Ms Ruiz purchased a 4000 hectacre reserve known as Serere.  The land was severely damaged by illegal logging and other unauthorized exploitations but Ms Ruiz and her team have brought it back to life.  It is now one of the most beautiful and biologically diverse places on the planet (as you can see in this Serere video).

Can Eco Tourism Help Save the Rainforest?

With much of the reforestation already in progress, the job of patrolling the rainforest and protecting it’s inhabitants now takes center stage at Serere.  That’s where the strategy of ecotourism comes in.  Guests can join local guides on daily hikes and canoe rides throughout the reserve.  Thus the land is patrolled while visitors enjoy the amazing biodiversity of life in the forest (we saw 5 different species of monkeys in one day).  Learn more about ecotourism supporting rainforest conservation on this Madidi Travel video.

Having lunch with Rosamaria Ruiz and Madidi Travel team members
Having lunch with Rosamaria Ruiz,  Madidi Travel team members and volunteers.  We were in Rurrenabaque, the launch point for Amazon rainforest ecotourism adventures.  Now is the time to go, if you’re thinking of visiting the Amazon.  The US dollar is currently very strong in Bolivia and the need for your support of ecotourism is urgent.

 

 

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.