Recycled-plastic-teak Isn't it ironic that most things made of plastic are used only once and then thrown into the trash, although plastic itself is a material that lasts forever– that the Earth simply cannot digest?  In fact, scientists tell us that every bit of plastic that has ever been created still exists, except the small amount that has been incinerated (which has become toxic air pollution).

It's probably not realistic to think we can eliminate single use plastics, like grocery bags and water, milk and soda bottles so perhaps the next best thing is to recycle them.  Can you believe this high end outdoor furniture that looks like teak wood, is actually recycled plastic?

 

 

 

Plastic-adirondack-chairsSo are these colorful, high quality Adirondack chairs.  They're made of 90-100% recycled milk jugs, while the faux teak furniture above is made from recycled plastic grocery bags.  I think they're beautiful and comfy, but the coolest thing is that they last forever.  Of course– they're plastic.  The recycled plastic is made into faux lumber that has about the same weight and strength as teak wood.  A typical chair weighs 40-60 pounds and offers unparalleled resistance to weather, mold, mildew, salt and insects.  No big surprise– have you ever seen a plastic water bottle that's been corroded or eaten by bugs?

We even give this all weather patio furniture a lifetime guarantee which is pretty much unheard of for outdoor furniture.  Check them out on our Vermont Woods Studios website, see what you think and let me know.  

 

 

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This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Vermont-furniture Many thanks to filmmaker Luke Stafford of Mondo Media for creating a beautiful, professional video about Vermont Woods Studios Handcrafted Furniture.  The video features two of our favorite woodworkers: Chad Woodruff of Vernon, Vermont and Greg Goodman of Brattleboro, Vermont.  Luke visited both of their studios and filmed them in action. 

Chad was making pieces for his line of mission-craftsman style furniture and Greg was working on a live edge wood slab table made out of a local catalpa tree.  We thank them both for taking time out of their busy schedules to introduce our customers to their work.  I can tell you that they are some of the finest artisans in our state and we are proud to be working with them.

You can view the video by going to our Vermont Woods Studios homepage and clicking on the third box down on the right where it says "watch".  Let me know how you like the show!

 

 

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This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

A warm* rain has finally come to Vermont to wash away some of the 4 feet of snow that’s been piled in my front yard for the longest time.  I can’t remember ever having such a snowy Febuary… and it was great fun for awhile.

But now I’m ready for Spring, and leafing through the photos of our new line of POLYWOOD outdoor patio furniture is lifting my spirits.  Manjula and Dennis are finishing putting the final touches on the outdoor furniture section of our website even as customers start receiving our first deliveries of POLYWOOD chairs, tables and chaises.

POLYWOOD furniture is 100% made in America and we are the only company I know of that offers a lifetime guarantee on it.

Besides the fact that it’s made out of recycled plastic, I love the aspect that we no longer have to clear-cut the rainforest for tropical woods like teak and mahogany that were once the only real choice for durable outdoor furniture.   It’s a win-win:  we’re taking waste out of the waste stream and we’re conserving forestlands at the same time.  Not to mention the fact that it’s beautiful and durable.

Check out this very cool outdoor patio furniture today.  Even if you’re not shopping, just looking at the pictures will help lift you out of the winter doldrums… and make you start to Think Spring.  Or summer.  Or maybe even a tropical vacation…

 

 

*In Vermont, at this time of year we can define “warm” as anything above 32F  🙂

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This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.


American-wood-bed-furniture Have you ever thought about where your wood furniture comes from?  
Over the past few decades, the organic food movement has made us ask questions about the origin of our food. Now the fundamental concerns voiced in that movement are being extrapolated to the furniture and flooring industries. People want to know where their furniture comes from and what they're finding out is often more disturbing than the facts that were uncovered regarding the origins of our food.

For facts about the origin of your furniture, check out Vermont Woods Studios' latest article on American Wood Furniture and Global Forest Conservation at Ezine.

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This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

natural cherry wood
Our American Shaker Large Sideboard in natural cherry wood.

Let’s talk about natural cherry wood furniture.

Today I wanted to provide some detail about naturally occurring mineral deposits that are a characteristic of cherry.

In cherry wood small black flecks occur in the grain where tiny amounts of sap were stored in the cherry tree.

natural cherry wood
You can see on these panels the little pockets where sap once lived.

Mineral deposits (or pitch pockets) are natural and randomly occurring.  They do not diminish the strength or quality of your furniture.  As we say: they add to its uniqueness.

The frequency of mineral deposits in our furniture varies with each tree utilized but it is largely reflected in the product photos here and throughout our website.  Like any other fine furniture maker we cannot guarantee the absence of mineral deposits in our cherry wood furniture and we cannot consider the presence of mineral deposits a reason for furniture returns, per our lifetime guarantee policy.

natural cherry wood
Our Loft Bedroom Collection in natural cherry wood. Note the mineral deposits on the two bottom left drawers of the dresser.

Looking for Cherry Furniture with Virtually No Mineral Deposits?

Most of our furniture makers are reluctant to offer cherry furniture without mineral deposits for a couple reasons. First, it is against our sustainable forestry principles.  Up to five times the number of trees need to be harvested to produce furniture with virtually no mineral deposits.  Second, the presence of mineral deposits in cherry wood can be a matter of opinion.  What one customer might feel was mineral-deposit free furniture may not be the same for another customer.

If mineral deposits are an issue for you, give us a call.  We’ll work something out… although I should mention that the price of a “virtually mineral deposit-free” piece is generally about twice that of the regular piece.

natural cherry wood

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This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.